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Do writers have to write every day?

Do writers have to write every day?

I haven’t written a single word on any of my projects in a while. I’ve thought about them. I’ve taken some notes. Some may suggest that I have writer’s block.

But I don’t.

I read some quote that suggests that to be a writer you have to write every day.

Bullshit. That’s probably true for whoever said that, but guess what, not every writer is the same.

We don’t all write about the same things. Fiction or non. Novels, or poetry, articles, blog posts. Fantasy, sci-fi, romance, war. Some of us plot while others fly by the seat of our pants while telling a story. It drives me nuts when someone likes to hand out pearls about what makes someone a writer and tries saying others are not because they don’t do things the way you do.

We are all different. People can be creative in different ways. Writers don’t come marching out from a pod of sameness! We’re weird! So why would we have limits placed on the things that make us what we are?

If you want to list things that help to turn a good writer into a great writer by improving their craft, I’ll probably agree with a lot of those things. But that writers have to write every day? Plllltttt! Get outta here with that.

When I try to write every day, I just add a bunch of worthless crap to my pages. So instead, I go for walks. I think. Showering is a top choice of mine to think about my projects. Reading–I read and study to learn how to make my writing better. There are so many other things that I can do and guess what, they don’t undo the fact that I’m a writer.

Just because I’m not adding to my word count doesn’t make me less of a writer than someone who scribbled out a few words so they can fit into someone else’s idea of what “should” be done.

Do painters have to paint every day to be a painter? Do sculptors have to sculpt every day?

I believe we artists benefit from taking some time to step away, look up from our art, and observe the people and the world around us.

And I don’t have writer’s block. I actually don’t believe in writer’s block. At least not for this writer. When I’m ready to write, I always do.

Like cookies in an oven, my ideas and my thoughts need to bake before I’m ready to take them out and share them. When I write, I write A LOT. All at once. I don’t write every day.  When I’m in the midst of a project, I’ll write every day, multiple times a day!

I get so sick of others telling me how my process should work because it’s how they work or saying my passion isn’t as strong as theirs because I don’t do what they do.

Bullsh*t. I’m off for a walk with my buddy, and I’ll be working on those ideas in my head until they’re ready to be poured onto the page.

CutieWalk

 

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Trust Yourself

Trust Yourself

It’s only been a few months since I started writing my first adult novel. When I wrote the words “Chapter One” on the blank page, I have to admit, I seriously doubted I could reach the adult-length word count. I had only ever written middle-grades, and the thought of doubling my longest novel scared the living shit out of me.

I had so much doubt about whether I could do it or not but I didn’t let it stop me. And unlike before, I also didn’t try to write in any of the ways that I hear suggested by other authors. I stayed true to my creative process. Fast forward a few months and I’m nearing my target word count with no fear of not getting there.

The best part…I’ve had fun writing again. I haven’t struggled (much). Writing in a way that’s right for me (flying by the seat of my pants) and setting my doubts to the side has proven to be a winning combo.

So, lessons learned.

1) Don’t listen to anyone on HOW to write. Trust your intuition.

2) Believe that you can do it. (And if you don’t believe, just pretend you believe and get started)

 

I did, and now I’m a #NanoWinner2017 with less than 20,000 words to go to reach my word count goal.

NaNo-2017-Winner-Facebook-Cover

rocky